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winoutreach5

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Posts posted by winoutreach5

  1. I was testing a few things out in my own lab environment to recreate the scenario you are in in an attempt to reproduce the error you are experiencing. I, unfortunately, could not recreate it. So, with that said here are a few things to check -- first, have you pulled the network driver directly from the manufacturer’s site? For example, if the NIC is integrated have you check with Realetk, Intel or whoever makes the NIC in question?

     

    Presuming that the issue does lie within the driver store there are a few things you will also want to check; there are three steps in the driver injection process and each one needs to be verified. I understand you have already check the ZTIDrivers.log, but just to confirm the other 2:

     

    · Were the needed drivers copied locally by ZTIDrivers.wsf?

    · Did SETUP inject the drivers into the driver store?

    · Did PNP install the drivers from the driver store?

     

    The log files to review for the driver store are ZTIDrivers.log, setupact.log, cbs.log and setupapi.dev.log

     

    Also, while looking for a solution to your problem I came across this thread from the TechNet forums in which Johan helped a poster with a similar issue to your own by checking the driver store; it might be worth it to check the thread out and see if any of Johan’s tips assist you.

     

    Finally, I would strongly recommend upgrading, if possible, your MDT Toolkit version to the latest version as driver injection stores as well as other features have been improved greatly. I understand your need for approval in your situation but I do feel that upgrading to the latest toolkit version could help alleviate some of the issues above in addition to significantly simplify your hybrid image deployment process.

     

    Keep me posted!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
    The Springboard Series on TechNet

  2. I have a few questions regarding your post. First, is there a particular reason why you are using MDT 2010 Update 1 as opposed to MDT 2012 Update 1 or MDT 2013? If you are deploying Windows 7 and later, you should be able to use MDT 2013.

     

    My next question is regarding the C:\Drivers\Nic directory – is this a directory you created? I ask because the directory you specified is not a default directory for drivers. You might want to also check out the setupapi.dev.log for troubleshooting drivers. Typically speaking, you would import the needed drivers into the out-of-box drivers in your deployment share and then you will want to select the selection profile in the desired task sequence. More on Out-of-Box driver management can be found in this TechNet blog article.

     

    Keep me posted!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  3. According to the TechNet blog post, Configuration Manager PXE Service Point Errors, the error code 0xC1030104 could imply that your WDS Server is actually not configured properly. I believe RocketMan is on the right track, however another step you could try is to initialize the server at the command line by running the following command:

     

    “wdsutil /initialize-server /REMINST:"D:\remoteinstall" (without quotations) where D:\remoteinstall is the directory that Configuration Manager had configured WDS to use.

     

    You also might try to stop and restart the Windows Deployment Services Server in the services.msc to see if that will resolve your issue as well.

     

    Keep us posted!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
    The Springboard Series on TechNet

  4. Hi Snehal,

     

    The first link in my response offers two unattend.xml files. Within those files, you will find lines you can add to your unattend file within Windows SIM. An excerpt from an unattend.xml file for x86 can be found below:

     

    (Please note, this is put in the oobeSystem settings pass)

     

    <SynchronousCommand wcm:action="add">

    <CommandLine>%windir%\Distribution\Bitlocker\EnableBitlocker.vbs /on:tpm /rk /promptuser /l:%windir%\Distribution\Bitlocker\enable.log</CommandLine>

    <Description>Enable Bitlocker with TPM only and create recovery password and recovery key</Description>

    <Order>3</Order>

    </SynchronousCommand>

     

    Please let me know if you are looking for something else.

     

    Thank you,

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro
    The Springboard Series on TechNet

  5. You might want to check out the unattend files available from the MSDN page here as they may be able to assist you with configuring settings in your own unattend files depending on the type of operating system and architecture you are deploying. Also, since you have a dedicated server for WDS you might want to consider using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) for both the imaging process as well as the deployment process. First off, MDT is free. MDT can integrate directly with WDS and can be setup to PXE boot for both a Sysprep and Capture task sequence and lite-touch deployment. While I understand you do not want to recapture the image, MDT greatly simplifies the sysprep and capture process.

     

    Next, MDT can be used to deploy Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008R2. Using MDT, you can easily add both applications and drivers, manage Windows updates, create task sequences, prompt for a computer name, join a domain, add a KMS or MAK product key, create an administrator account, specify time zone, etc. You can also import all user data into the new environment using the User State Migration Tool (also free). In addition to creating standard client task sequences, as stated above, you can create sysprep and capture task sequences that will do just that – sysprep and capture an image of your reference machine. To become familiar with the process of using MDT, you might want to check out these videos from the Springboard Series page on TechNet:

     

    Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012

    Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced

     

    Hope this helps and keep us posted!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  6. The more information you could provide about your setup and how you are attempting to run setup, the better we will be able to assist you. From the limited description of your process and the error you are encountering, I have to wonder if you are running sysprep with the /generalize switch. The generalize switch removes all system specific information, including the computer name, which would then cause Windows Welcome to prompt for computer name after reboot. More on how sysprep works can be found on from the Springboard Series on TechNet article here.

     

    Keep us posted!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  7. As Btag stated, you will need to ensure that the system is properly joined to the domain. I know you stated that you were able to join the machine to the domain but just to double check you will want to read the TechNet library article, Join the Computer to the Domain for assistance with this process.

     

    Also, you will also likely benefit from the TechNet article, Automating the Domain Join, as it explains the process of editing your unattend file to automate the process of joining a domain.

    Finally, when looking for a solution to your problem I came across this TechNet forums thread in which a few members suggest various ways to properly logon to the system as a domain user. Typically speaking, you will select the option to connect as an “other user” from within the Windows 7 logon welcome screen. When prompted for another user, you should see a username and password field. In the user name field you will type the following information in the following format:

     

    domainname\username

     

    As far as the password field is concerned, you will type the password for the domain user in to the password field.

     

    Also, for additional information on managing domains and configuring Windows Client you might want to check out the Springboard Series on TechNet.

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  8. You might want to look into using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT). MDT acts as a common console for all of your images; plus, it’s free and it can be used to deploy Windows XP, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2003, Windows 2008 and Windows 2008R2. Using MDT, you can easily add both applications and drivers, manage Windows updates, create task sequences, prompt for a computer name, join a domain, add a KMS or MAK product key, create an administrator account, specify time zone, etc. You can also import all user data into the new environment using the User State Migration Tool (also free). In addition to creating standard client task sequences, you can create sysprep and capture task sequences that will do just that – sysprep and capture an image of your reference machine.

     

    To become familiar with the process of using MDT, you might want to check out these videos from the Springboard Series page on TechNet:

     

    Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012

    Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced

     

    You can also create bootable media directly from MDT since you will not likely go with the PXE boot method. Upon booting into the LiteTouchPE environment, you can select the image you wish to deploy, which task sequence you wish to use and then proceed to enter the necessary computer name and domain you wish to join.

     

    Also, if you don’t already have the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (Windows ADK) for Windows 8, I strongly recommend downloading it today. You will specifically want to pay special attention to the Windows System Image Manager (WSIM) as it offers an easy to use interface for editing your unattend.xml file. The Windows ADK will also come in handy if you go the MDT route.

     

    Hope this helps and keep us posted on your progress!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

    • Like 1
  9. Thank you for your response. I have since started to use MDT in conjunction with WDS. This has made my life a lot easier and seems to be the best solution for what I am trying to accomplish and what my company's needs are.

     

    I am so happy to hear that, tmcgraw, and please feel free to let me know if you need any help in the future.

     

    Jessica

    Windows Outreach Team -- IT Pro

  10. Since the domain join usually happens as part of the task sequence after the deployment completes, I wonder what your BIOS boot order is set to. If every time your system starts and launches directly to your deployment share, then you may want to alter your boot order. It would be helpful to know how you are deploying Windows client via MDT and whether you or not you are booting to removable media or PXE connection. Regardless, you will typically want to ensure the hard drive is next in the boot list after the first boot option is not found so that Windows can proceed to boot into its OS and finish the specified tasks as a part of the selected task sequence.

     

    If you haven’t checked out the Springboard Series on TechNet, I strongly suggest you at least watch the following videos as you become more familiar with MDT and the deployment process:

     

    · Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012

    · Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced

    Finally, anytime someone is attempting to do a capture process and / or deployment I always recommend the following videos:

     

    · Alphabet Soup Deployment: Understanding MDT, WDS, MAP, ACT, SCCM, and USMT

    · Deploy Windows 7 The Easy Way: Using WDS, MDT and AIK – Step-By-Step

    Hope this helps and keep us posted!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  11. The Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (Windows ADK) is the upgraded version of Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK). As you can see from the system requirements listed here on the Microsoft Download page for the Windows AIK, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 are no longer supported but Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008R2 and Windows Server 2012 are.

     

    You also might want to check out the Windows Deployment with the Windows ADK library document from the Springboard Series site on TechNet.

     

    You will want to uninstall Windows AIK prior to installing the Windows ADK to prevent any issues from arising. After you do that, you should be able to proceed with your deployment and migration. If you still need to be able to deploy and maintain Windows XP images for deployment, you might want to consider setting up a separate workstation with MDT and Windows AIK to maintain Windows XP deployment capabilities.

     

    You also might want to check the Deliver and Deploy Windows 7 page from the Springboard Series on TechNet as there are a great deal of resources available to assist with the migration process.

     

    Hope this helps!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  12. Just as Jorgen touched on, you might want to take a look at the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit for your deployment and imaging needs.

     

    First off, it is entirely free and can deploy images via USB drives and DVD; it can even integrate with WDS for network deployments. In addition to the above, MDT can also manage multiple images, drivers, packages and software for nearly any Windows Operating system deployment including Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2012.

     

    By using MDT in tandem with WDS you will be able to keep a thin image, which could be the base install.wim from the OS DVD. You can create a new standard client task sequence for the newly captured image of your reference machine and you can add all your necessary settings such as domainjoin, systemlocale, time zone, etc. You can then add all necessary drivers specific to each hardware configuration and MDT will install the proper drivers based on PnP calls. Applications can be installed as post installation tasks, so when a new version of an application or driver is released it can be changed in MDT easily. There is no need to refresh the image.

     

    Finally, you can integrate it with Windows Update or WSUS to make sure the deployment is fully updated; alternatively, you can put the updates into MDT as packages to be installed during deployment.

     

    To become more familiar with MDT you might want to check out the following videos from the Springboard Series page on TechNet:

     

    · Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012

    · Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced

     

    Alternatively, should you still want a walkthrough for using WDS for deployments, you might find the Deployment Day Session 3: Deployment using WDS video helpful as well.

     

    Hope this helps and keep us posted on your progress!

     

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team -- IT Pro

  13. First, it always is helpful when we know what tool you are using for deployment. You mentioned that you are having trouble with a litetouch script but that your deployment is supposed to be zerotouch. When it comes to errors during deployment, it is always a good idea to check the logs first. If you are using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) or System Center Configuration Manager (Config Manager) for your deployment, you might want to read the Springboard Series TechNet article Inside Setup - Troubleshoot Windows Deployment Issues as it walks you through the process on how to check the log files and provides a link to where the log files can be found.

     

    Another library article that may also be helpful is Understand Failures and Log Files also from the TechNet page.

     

    Hope this helps and keep us posted on your progress!

     

    Jessica

    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  14. To start, there is a great wiki on TechNet that describes, in detail, the process of adding a boot image to a WDS server. If you have other Windows 7 Enterprise installation media around, it might be a good idea to try and import the boot.WIM file from an alternate source as it is possible the disc you are currently using is scratched or damaged. Also, when looking for a solution to your problem, I came across this post from the TechNet forums site in which the poster had a very similar issue to the one you are currently experiencing. There are several suggestions in the thread which ultimately helped resolve his issue; it might be worth it to check it out.

     

    Another thought that you might be interested in is to check out the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) because it acts as a common console for all of your deployments.

     

    First off, it is entirely free and can deploy images via USB drives and DVD; it can even integrate with WDS for network deployments. In addition to the above, MDT can also manage multiple images, drivers, packages and software for nearly any Windows Operating system deployment including Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2012.

     

    By using MDT in tandem with WDS you will be able to keep a thin image, which could be the base install.wim from the OS DVD. You can create a new standard client task sequence for the newly captured image of your reference machine and you can add all your necessary settings such as domainjoin, systemlocale, time zone, etc. You can then add all necessary drivers specific to each hardware configuration and MDT will install the proper drivers based on PnP calls. Applications can be installed as post installation tasks, so when a new version of an application or driver is released it can be changed in MDT easily. There is no need to refresh the image.

     

    Finally, you can integrate it with Windows Update or WSUS to make sure the deployment is fully updated; alternatively, you can put the updates into MDT as packages to be installed during deployment.

     

    To become more familiar with MDT you might want to check out the following videos from the Springboard Series page on TechNet:

     

    · Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012

    · Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced

     

    Hope this helps and keep us posted on your progress!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  15. First off, congratulations on deciding to use the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit! Judging from your list of things you want, MDT will be able to meet all of your needs very easily. While MDT can be used for all deployments, including Windows XP, you will also be able to use it for Windows 7 and Windows 8. Through your research you may have already discovered that you can integrate MDT with Windows Deployment Services (WDS) which can help streamline deployment by allowing you to push images out via PXE boot.

     

    A good place to start when it comes to drivers and using the driver storage feature within MDT is with this blog post from the Windows Server Core team.

    Presuming your image files are in WIM file format, you should be able to import the desired WIM files into your deployment share within MDT and then create associated task sequences with all necessary settings.

     

    You may have already seen them but I always recommend the following videos from the Springboard Series on TechNet to become more familiar with imaging and deployment using MDT:

     

    · Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012

    · Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced

     

    Hope this helps and please keep me posted on your progress and any questions you may come across!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  16. When looking for a solution to your scenario, I came across this TechNet article which states that you need to ensure the drive that hosts the Active Directory database (NTDS.DIT) has free space that represents at least 20% of the NTDS.DIT file prior to attempting to upgrade to Windows Server 2012. If there is insufficient disk space, the upgrade can fail as you have experienced several times. As a possible solution, you might want to try an offline defragmentation of the Active Directory as the above article suggests.

     

    For more information and resources concerning Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 you might want to also check out the Windows 8 Springboard Series page on TechNet.

     

    Hope this helps!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  17. I realize you already mentioned creating a script in order to have the applications show on the start screen; however I wanted to chime in here.

     

    There are two answers which are each contingent upon what kind of application / app you are deploying / pushing out. If you are sideloading apps, you will need to provision them. If you are deploying desktop applications, then you could either setup a reference machine with all the applications, run sysprep which will create the applayout.bin file and copy it as a last step in the deployment process. There is a blog post here that walks you through customizing the Windows 8 start screen utilizing the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT). You can use MDT in tandem with System Center Configuration Manager 2012 SP1.

     

    As discussed in the TechNet library article, How to Customize the Start Screen, you can also use the CopyProfile command to preserve the Start screen layout which will allow you to add and remove tiles, re-size tiles, label tiles, and customize the Start screen color, accent and desktop wallpaper.

     

    More resources regarding Windows 8 deployment can also be found on the Springboard Series for Windows 8 page on TechNet.

     

    Hope this helps!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  18. You might want to try to update your customsettings.ini file with the following line:



    SkipComputerName=NO



    The above command should allow the computer name prompt screen to populate which will in turn allow you to enter the necessary information. Also, remember to update your deployment share after you update your customsettings.ini file. Several other settings that you can add to your customsettigns.ini file can be found in a screenshot about 80% of the way down on the Automating the Migration from Windows XP to Windows 7 End-to-End library page.


    For additional resources pertaining to the topic of deployment I recommend checking out the Deliver and Deploy Windows 7 and Deliver and Deploy Windows 8 pages.

    Hope this helps!

    Jessica


    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  19. First off, here is a video from TechNet with Microsoft’s Michael Niehaus of the MDT team chatting about the changes from MDT 2010 to MDT 2012 and here is a blog post you will want to read to learn about the changes made from MDT 2012 to MDT 2012 Update 1. In moving from MDT 2010 to MDT 2012 Update 1 you should not encounter any issues as the Deployment Share will automatically upgrade and you will not lose any of your task sequences or data. Still, it is always a recommended practice to first make a backup of any necessary data prior to upgrading an application or operating system.


    Next, from what it sounds like you are trying to accomplish, you might want to look into using a task sequence variable and setting the OSDComputerName as suggested in this TechNet forums thread and this one as well. You should be able to set a variable with an existing prefix and then allow them to enter or change the suffix with the asset tag. Examples can be found in the previous TechNet forums thread I linked as well as the two included above. Also, so long as you have the SkipComputerName=No entered in your CS.ini you should still be prompted to edit the computer name accordingly prior to proceeding with deployment.


    Let me know if that works!

    Jessica

    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  20. First off, you might want to upgrade to the latest version of MDT which can be downloaded from the Deliver and Deploy Windows 8 page on the Springboard Series from TechNet. Second, it is important to note that Windows does not permit computer names that exceed 15 characters as stated in this Microsoft Knowledge Base article. Third, and to answer your question, you could use variables to achieve what your goal. When looking for a solution to your problem I came across this TechNet forums thread in which the OP posed a similar question as well as this TechNet forums thread in which Peter van der Woude provides a good resource and option as well. Finally, I recommend reading the Using Command Shell Scripts with MDT TechNet blog post for additional guidance as
    well.


    Hope this helps and keep us posted!

    Jessica


    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  21. First off, congrats on solving your deployment issue. However, when reading your two posts, I thought of another solution that you may find beneficial for deployment. In addition to using WDS and unattend files for automating your deployments, you might also want to checkout MDT, the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit, which is a free utility provided by Microsoft and can help automate all deployments from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2012. Using MDT, you can create hardware independent images and add drivers as well as applications to a deployment share and then create a task sequence tailored to your deployment needs. Creating an unattend file and deploying a captured image using WDS is a great method but it couldn’t hurt to also see if MDT would also be able to meet your needs. Perhaps one of my favorite things about MDT is that it can even be used in conjunction with WDS.

     

    To become more familiar with MDT as a stand-alone product as well as in conjunction with WDS, I recommend the following 3 videos from the Springboard Series page on TechNet:

     

    · Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012

    · Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced

    · Deployment Day Session 3: Deployment using WDS

     

    Anyway, again, I am glad you were able to get your deployment working in your virtual environment. Feel free to reach out with any questions.

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  22. I’m not entirely sure what you are asking but it sounds like you could use some help becoming more familiar with MDT. To start, there are some great walk-through videos on the Springboard Series on TechNet site. The first one is Deployment Day Session 1: Introduction to MDT 2012 and the second is Deployment Day Session 2: MDT 2012 Advanced.

     

    You are using the correct version of MDT 2012 as the update 1 is the latest version.

     

    I strongly recommend checking out the videos above and reading the documentation on the Springboard page.

     

    Hope this helps!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – IT Pro

  23. Presuming you are using Windows Server with Active Directory you might want to consider Group Policy to set parameters for device installation. For example, in this TechNet library article, under the group policy settings for device installation header, the 3rd group policy option described is “Prevent installation of devices that match these device IDs”. If you knew the device ID of the 5-in-1 card reader, you could disable it from group policy and then push that out.

    I would also recommend checking out the Security and Control page from the Springboard Series on TechNet for additional tips and resource pages for controlling Windows 7.

     

    Keep us posted if this works for you!

     

    Jessica
    Windows Outreach Team – It Pro

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